Liming – Settling – Nature’s Little Secrets

No place more evokes the tourist image more than the Virgin Islands.  Like Timbouctou or Outer Mongolia, they are a myth of a placename.  I doubt most people would be able to place them in the Caribbean let alone pin point where they are.  It is hardly surprising, they cover less than 25 square miles on the British side, and only a bit more on the US side.

My first ever view of BVI _ looking down on Beef Island Airport from the LIAT plane

My first ever view of BVI _ looking down on Beef Island Airport from the LIAT plane

 But it was to here I came in 2000 for the first time, about 8 years after I had first helped them create their map of the coral reefs and seagrass beds in Chatham.  I landed at the tiny Beef Island Airport and we taxied into Road Town, bump bump bump over the speed humps all through the east end.  I walked around this curious town, amazed at how over-Americanised it was with its parking lots, big square office buildings and the ubiquitous green road signs.  The northern Caribbean, being closer to the USA I suppose, was more susceptible to American trappings.  They were also generally more prosperous than the southern islands.  There were huge brightly coloured mansions on the hillsides, the ones under construction looked to be larger again, the cars were not beat up old Toyotas but expensive gleaming 4WD.  There were better facilities in the hotels, the offices and shops oozed money.  I was relieved when I saw a cockerel crossing the road in the middle of this; 

Why did the Chicken Cross the Road - because it lived in the Caribbean

Why did the Chicken Cross the Road – because it lived in the Caribbean

I was still in the Caribbean.  The backstreets still had the chattel houses and the accents were definitely Caribbean.

 The main island of Tortola was all I saw the first time around, but it was stunning.  Although the south coast is pretty rudimentary  – where the electricity is generated, the rubbish burnt and the fuel oil comes in, the north coast is a series of magnificent bays, each with their own particular view of the other 60 or so islands.  Jost van Dyke to the west and the US Virgin Islands in the distance, the Southern Cays of Norman (Reputedly Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island), Peter, Cooper, Salt, Ginger and Dead Chest (yo ho ho and a bottle of rum – we really are in the stuff of myths here).  To the east Virgin Gorda, the fat virgin lying on her side, her overdeveloped mounds covered in green forest.

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6 thoughts on “Liming – Settling – Nature’s Little Secrets

  1. Hello! This is kind of off topic but I need some advice from an established blog.

    Is it very difficult to set up your own blog? I’m not
    very techincal but I can figure things out pretty fast.
    I’m thinking about creating my own but I’m not
    sure where to start. Do you have any points or suggestions?
    Thanks

    • Hey there – not at all – I think the main thing is to write something in Word first and edit it carefully. I’ve had to scan all the photos myself as they are from the period before digital cameras, but otherwise you can upload them easily. Then think how you want to divide it into bite size chunks that people can come back to and read in their busy days. Nothing that technical so far. And then WordPress is actually a good place to get set up. Use the posts to publish the blog entries and if you get adventurous make a few pages to explain who you are and some other things (for example check out my timeline page). WordPress has lots of help on how to set up blogs as do many other people who write help manuals through WordPress. Hope that helps. Once you get started you can think about getting more adventurous.

  2. Liming – Settling – Nature’s Little Secrets – String Knife and Paper

  3. Liming – Settling – Nature’s Little Secrets – String Knife and Paper

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